Blog

September 2020

Do You Suffer From Fibromyalgia?

It is thought that nearly 1 in 20 people are affected by fibromyalgia. Of these, a considerable 80-90% of those affected are women. This complex condition can rear its head suddenly and be tricky to diagnose. Patients can be misdiagnosed and consequently improperly treated for diseases that are similar to fibromyalgia.

A huge step forward in the treatment of this debilitating illness is being able to put a name to it. This is important not only with regards to assigning strategic treatment but also for patients being able to validate the pain that they feel.

Causes: Fibromyalgia a chronic condition characterized by pain in the soft tissue surrounding the muscles. Fibromyalgia syndrome can vary in severity and may affect one muscle or an entire group.

Symptoms: Patients report certain tender points or triggers that cause pain. Patients may also report other symptoms such as fatigue, depression and other psychological issues.

Treatments: Physical therapy is considered as the best option for Fibromyalgia syndrome. Interventional procedures include trigger point injections, spray and stretch techniques, and dry needling.

If you are dealing with fibromyalgia contact a local pain management specialist for help.

August 2020

Pain In the Lower Back, Hips Or Buttocks?
SI Joint Injections May Help

A sacroiliac (SI) joint injection is a treatment to help patients with pain in the buttocks, lower back and hips. These joints connect the bottom of your spine to your pelvis and provide support for the lower part of your body and your back.

If the SI joint is confirmed as your source of pain, an anti-inflammatory medication (corticosteroid) is included with the injection to provide pain relief by reducing inflammation within the joint.

If the patient experiences prolonged pain relief after a therapeutic sacroiliac joint injection, he or she can begin a physical therapy and rehabilitation program to further reduce pain and return the patient to normal activity levels.

If the therapeutic sacroiliac joint injection is successful in reducing or eliminating the patient's pain for a longer duration, it may be repeated up to three times per year, in conjunction with physical therapy and rehabilitation program, to help the patient maintain normal function.

What Will Happen During the Procedure?

You will lie on your stomach on a table. Then the area to be treated will be cleaned and covered with a special sheet. Before the procedure starts, a doctor will inject you with a local anesthetic. This will numb the skin over the area that will be treated. Then your doctor will inject the numbing medication and the steroid medication in the joint(s). You may feel some pressure when the medications will be injected. The entire procedure should take about 10 minutes.

About 20-30 minutes after the procedure, you will be asked to move your back to try to provoke your usual pain. You may or may not obtain improvement in the first few hours after the injection, depending on if the sacroiliac joint is your main pain source.

You may begin to notice an improvement in your pain 2-5 days after the injection. If you do not notice improvement within 10 days after the injection, it is unlikely to occur. You may take your regular medications after the procedure, but try to limit them for the first 4-6 hours after the procedure, so that the diagnostic information obtained from the procedure is accurate. You may be referred for physical or manual therapy after the injection while the numbing medicine is effective and/or over the next several weeks while the cortisone is working.

Risks and Side Effects

A SI joint injection is generally considered safe. The most common side effect is soreness in the injected area. The soreness will go away once the steroid starts to work.

July 2020

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)
Telltale Signs and Symptoms

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain syndrome that involves a region of the body, often one arm or leg, usually following trauma or injury. CRPS is rare, but can be very disabling, and is not considered normal. CRPS symptoms are much worse than the pain caused from the initial trauma or injury.

Most people with CRPS have constant, severe, burning pain in one part of the body. In severe cases, even the slightest touch can cause significant pain. Symptoms include swelling, changes in skin blood flow and temperature in the body part. Abnormal excessive sweating as changing in growth patterns for hair and nails may also occur.

CRPS is so painful that many people are not able to move the affected body part, which often leads to muscle stiffness, weakness, or atrophy. The less the person moves the limb, the worse the symptoms can become.

We do not know the full cause of CRPS, though it may be caused by changes in the nerves after injury. There is no certain cure for CRPS.

Once you have been diagnosed with CRPS, your doctor will work with you on a treatment plan to reduce pain, regain movement, and restore use of the affected limb.

Intensive physical therapy earlier in the course of the problem helps. Also, interventional procedures, such as stellate ganglion blocks, lumbar sympathetic blocks, or spinal cord stimulation, are performed by an interventional pain physician.

Because living with chronic pain can be hard both physically and mentally, psychosocial support is very important. Counseling, support groups, relaxation training, and other activities can help you cope better with pain even as you undergo treatment.

You and your interventional pain physician can work to reduce your pain, restore your movement, and improve your life.

June 2020

Suffering From Neck Pain?

Neck pain is the second most common complaint among patients second only to lower back pain. Most people will experience neck pain at some point in their lives.

Neck pain can be acute, meaning it lasts a few hours to a few weeks, or it can be chronic. Neck pain that lasts several weeks or longer is considered chronic neck pain. If your neck pain is so severe that you can't touch your chin to your chest despite a few days of self-care, seek immediate medical attention.

Causes of Neck Pain

There are myriad reasons that pain in the neck can occur, but usually the causes of neck pain are not serious. Sometimes the cause is obvious, a patient has had an accident or injury resulting a physical trauma that causes pain in the neck or cervical region. However, other times you may not be able to pin point a specific incident or don’t understand what happened to actually cause the pain you are experiencing.

Poor posture at work, such as leaning into your computer, and during hobbies, such as hunching over your workbench, are common causes of neck pain. Acute strain may also occur after sleeping in an awkward position.

Symptoms of Neck Pain

You may hear or feel clicking or grating (called “crepitus”) as you move your head. This is caused by roughened bony surfaces moving against each other or by ligaments rubbing against bone.

Neck pain is commonly associated with dull aching. Sometimes pain in the neck is worsened with movement of the neck. Other symptoms associated with some forms of neck pain include numbness, tingling, tenderness, sharp shooting pain, fullness, difficulty swallowing, pulsations, swishing sounds in the head, dizziness or lightheadedness, and gland swelling.

Treatments for Neck Pain

Applying ice massages for 5-10 minutes at a time to a painful area within the first 48 hours of pain onset can help relieve pain as can heat, which relaxes the muscles. Heat should be applied for pains lasting greater than 48 hours.

Rest – lie down from time to time during the day to give your neck a rest from holding up your head. Avoid prolonged rest, since too much inactivity can cause increased stiffness in your neck muscles.

Your doctor may recommend that you work with a physical therapist to learn neck exercises and stretches. A physical therapist can guide you through these exercises and stretches.

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) with or without an anti-inflammatory medicine such as ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen (Aleve) may help relieve your neck pain. It may take several days to settle the pain down. Stronger narcotic-containing medicines are usually not necessary, but your doctor may provide these for the first few days.

If severe neck pain occurs following an injury (motor vehicle accident, diving accident, or fall) medical care should be sought immediately. If there has not been an injury, you should seek medical care when neck pain is continuous and persistent, severe, accompanied by pain that radiates down the arms or legs, or by headaches, numbness, tingling, or weakness.

May 2020

Are You Suffering From Hip Pain?

The hip joint is a large ball and socket joint and is designed to withstand repeated motion and allow for fluid movement. Hip pain is a common complaint with a number of possible causes. The most common causes of hip pain are arthritis, bursitis, muscle strain, and nerve irritation. Treatment and management of hip pain is dependent on the diagnosis and any underlying illness that may be present.

Treatment Of Hip Pain

Below are some of the common treatment options that are pursued in the management of hip pain:

Medication Management: Over-the-counter pain medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve) are often sufficient in managing hip pain. There are also other prescription NSAIDs including Diclofenac, Naprosyn, Celebrex that have been proven to relieve hip pain. Opioids, or narcotic medications may be considered in the management of hip pain, if the pain is severe and if alternative pain management options fail to offer relief.

Physical Therapy: Physical therapy is an excellent treatment for managing hip pain. Therapy is directed to maintain the strength and range of motion of the hip through various stretches and strengthening exercises. Other techniques used in physical therapy include ultrasound therapy, heat therapy, and massage.

Joint Injections: Depending on the diagnosis, joint injections can be offered to help with pain relief. This is particularly useful in patients who have moderate to severe osteoarthritis of the hip. Arthritis of the hip can present as pain in the groin, and can also be felt in the thigh. Injecting a solution of local anesthetic and steroid can help reduce inflammation caused by arthritis and the results can be instantaneous.

In some cases, if the patient responds favorably to nerve blocks of the articular branches to the hip from the femoral and obturator nerves, radiofrequency ablation can be used to extend the duration of pain relief. This can be applied even in post-hip replacement pain.

PRP Therapy: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentrate of plasma that has higher amount of growth factors. It is used to help regenerate soft tissue and healing. Platelet-rich plasma can treat sports injuries, including torn ligaments and tendons, skeletal fractures, strained muscles, sprained knees and chronic tendon injuries.

Joint Replacement Surgery: In the event that the above treatments do not help joint replacement surgery is available. The classic indication for joint replacement surgery is some form of destructive osteoarthritis where the entire hip joint’s normal architecture is damaged.

April 2020

Sciatica Treatment Options

The sciatic nerve is the largest single nerve in the human body; it runs from each side of the lower spine through deep in the buttock into the back of the thigh and all the way down to the foot. It serves a vital role in connecting the spinal cord with the leg and foot muscles.

Sciatica is nerve pain from irritation of the sciatic nerve. Sciatica pain is typically felt from the low back to behind the thigh and radiating down below the knee. Treatments for sciatica depend on the underlying cause and the severity of the pain.

For severe or ongoing flare-ups of sciatic nerve pain, the condition may need to be treated so it does not get worse over time.

Readily available non-surgical remedies and regular exercise will go a long way toward relieving the pain most people experience.

For others, when the pain is severe or does not get better on its own, a more structured treatment approach, and possibly surgery, may be the best option for finding pain relief and preventing or minimizing future pain and/or dysfunction.

Non-surgical Treatment for Sciatica

The goals of non-surgical sciatica treatments are to relieve pain and any neurological symptoms caused by a compressed nerve root. There is a broad range of options available for sciatica treatment. One or more of the treatments below are usually recommended in conjunction with specific exercises.

Heat/Ice

For acute sciatic pain, heat and/or ice packs are readily available and can help alleviate the leg pain, especially in the initial phase. Usually ice or heat is applied for approximately 20 minutes, and repeated every two hours. Most people use ice first, but some find more relief with heat. The two may be alternated. It is best to apply ice with a cloth or towel placed between the ice and skin to avoid an ice burn.

Pain Medications

Over-the-counter or prescription medications are often effective in reducing or relieving sciatica pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (such as ibuprofen or naproxen), or oral steroids can reduce the inflammation that is usually part of the cause of pain. Muscle relaxants or narcotic medications may also be prescribed for the short term (a few days and up to two weeks) to alleviate pain.

Epidural Steroid Injections

If the pain is severe, an epidural steroid injection can reduce inflammation. Unlike oral medications, an injection goes directly into the painful area around the sciatic nerve to address the inflammation that may be causing pain.

While the effects tend to be temporary (providing pain relief for as little as one week or up to a year), and it does not work for everyone, an epidural steroid injection can be effective in relieving acute sciatic pain. Importantly, it can provide sufficient relief to allow a patient to progress with a conditioning and exercise program.

It is always advisable to have a qualified medical professional oversee any type of sciatica treatment.

March 2020

Occipital Neuralgia

Occipital neuralgia is a distinct type of headache characterized by piercing, throbbing, or electric-shock-like chronic pain in the upper neck, back of the head, and behind the ears, usually on one side of the head. Typically, the pain of occipital neuralgia begins in the neck and then spreads upwards.

Some individuals will also experience pain in the scalp, forehead, and behind the eyes. Their scalp may also be tender to the touch, and their eyes especially sensitive to light.

The location of pain is related to the areas supplied by the greater and lesser occipital nerves, which run from the area where the spinal column meets the neck, up to the scalp at the back of the head. The pain is caused by irritation or injury to the nerves, which can be the result of trauma to the back of the head, pinching of the nerves by overly tight neck muscles, compression of the nerve as it leaves the spine due to osteoarthritis, or tumors or other types of lesions in the neck.

Localized inflammation or infection, gout, diabetes, blood vessel inflammation (vasculitis), and frequent lengthy periods of keeping the head in a downward and forward position are also associated with occipital neuralgia. In many cases, however, no cause can be found. A positive response (relief from pain) after an anesthetic nerve block will confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment is generally symptomatic and includes massage and rest. In some cases, antidepressants may be used when the pain is particularly severe. Other treatments may include local nerve blocks and injections of steroids directly into the affected area. Occipital neuralgia is not a life-threatening condition. Many individuals will improve with therapy involving heat, rest, anti-inflammatory medications, and muscle relaxants. Recovery is usually complete after the bout of pain has ended and the nerve damage repaired or lessened.

Information provided by NIH

February 2020

Could You Have a Herniated Disc?

Disk herniation is usually caused by a gradual, aging-related wear and tear called disk degeneration. Also, spinal disk’s tissues lose some amount of water content with aging. Therefore, they become less flexible and more predisposed to tearing or rupturing.

Factors that increase the risk of disk herniation may include:

  • Excess body weight that can cause extra pressure on the disks.
  • Physically demanding jobs. Repetitive lifting, pushing, bending sideways and twisting may increase the risk of a herniated disk
  • Predisposition to developing a herniated disk can be inherited.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms of a herniated disk are:

  • Arm or leg pain - If the herniated disk occurs in the lower back, you will typically feel the intense pain in buttocks, thigh, and calf. The foot also can be involved. If the herniated disk is in the neck, the pain will typically be most intense in the shoulder and arm.
  • Numbness or tingling - Patients with a herniated disk often feel numbness or tingling in the body region served by the affected nerves.
  • Weakness - Muscles served by the affected nerves tend to weaken.

Treatments

A small number of people end up needing surgery to treat a herniated disc. However, most patients do well with simpler treatments, such as:

  • Pain medicines.
  • Drugs originally designed to control seizures also may be helpful in the treatment of the radiating nerve pain associated with a herniated disk.
  • Cortisone injections. Inflammation-suppressing corticosteroids may be given by injection directly into the area around the spinal nerves.
  • Medicines to relax the muscles (called muscle relaxants).
  • Injections of medicines that numb the back or reduce swelling.
  • Physical therapy to teach you special exercises and stretches.

In some cases, people with herniated disks need surgery. Your physician can suggest this when conservative treatments fail to reduce pain after six weeks. Moreover, surgery is indicated for patients who continue to experience:

  • Numbness or weakness
  • Difficulty standing or walking
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control

In most cases, surgeons can remove just the protruding portion of the disk. However, in some cases, the entire disk must be removed and after that, the vertebrae may need to be fused together with metal hardware.

More Blogs
January 2020

Knee pain is something that affects millions of people every single day. Whether you have sustained some sort of acute injury to your knee joint or you are experiencing chronic pain as the result of regular wear and tear- knee issues can really bring a lot of discomfort and unhappiness to your overall quality of life. But don’t you worry Dr. Chada and her team have many treatments that can help!Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769.

In addition, the following:

  • Exercise programs can help
  • Losing weight in some cases is also a factor
  • Or sometimes interventional procedures can help such as (steroid injections, facet joint injections, medications etc.)
December 2019

If you or anyone you love is suffering from a weakening of the bones (osteoporosis) and it has caused the vertebrae to compress or collapse, causing pain or a hunched posture we can help! If your Osteoporosis is causing you discomfort, pain, and other symptoms please contact Dr. Chada at (240) 929-6652. Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center - 12150 Annapolis Rd Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769.

Procedure: Kyphoplasty

Similar to vertebroplasty, it is designed to stop the pain caused by a spinal fracture, to stabilize the bone, and to restore some or all of the lost vertebral body height caused by a compression fracture(s).During Kyphoplasty,Dr. Chada would make a small incision in the back through which the doctor places a narrow tube. Using fluoroscopy to guide the tube to the correct position, a path is created through the back into the fracture area through the pedicle of the involved vertebrae.

Using fluoroscopy images, Dr. Chada would insert a special balloon through the tube and into the vertebrae and then gently inflates this balloon. As the balloon inflates it elevates the compression of the vertebra and creates a cavity inside the vertebrae, which is filled with a cementlike material called polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). This material hardens quickly, stabilizing the bone.

The procedure takes about one hour for each vertebra involved. Patients will be observed closely in the recovery room immediately following the kyphoplasty procedure for about 1-3 hours. Patients should not drive until they are given approval by their doctor.

November 2019

How does Spinal Arthritis cause pain?

When a vertebral facet joint moves, healthy cartilage ensures the facets glide against one another. Spinal osteoarthritis begins with facet cartilage degeneration. This cartilage degeneration doesn’t necessarily cause back pain, but it can lead to joint changes that cause pain:

  • When facet cartilage is damaged or missing, the vertebral facets rub or grate against one another, resulting in excess friction and more joint damage.
  • The joint damage and friction lead to inflammation, which may cause pain and stiffness.
  • Pain signals travel through the affected facet joint. These signals can cause the back muscles to go into spasm.
  • The combination of facet joint inflammation and muscle spasm can cause pain and stiffness.

What can you do if you have spinal osteoarthritis?

Treatments include exercise programs, weight loss and interventional procedures such as:

  • Steroid injections and facet joint injections
  • Nerve blocks such as the genicular nerve block
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs)
  • Hyaluronic Acid Injections such as Supartz knee injections
  • Medications

If your Spinal Arthritis is causing you discomfort, pain, and other symptoms please contact Dr. Chada at (240) 929-6652. Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd, Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769

October 2019

What is Hip Bursitis?

Hip bursitis is the inflammation of one or more bursae (small sacs) of synovial fluid in the hip. The bursae rest at the points where internal functionaries, such as muscles and tendons, slide across bone causing pain and making movement difficult.

Common symptoms reported by people with hip bursitis

  • Stress
  • Pain
  • Fatigue

Causes

There are many causes of Bursitis, however, the most common are:

  • An impact/traumatic injury –an impact injury causes the bursa to swell, resulting in pain and irritation at the joint that was previously healthy.
    Example: Falling on your knee or knocking your hip as walking by a sharp corner of a table.
  • Repetitive irritation –this is when bursitis is caused by repetitive use of the joint.
    Example: Washing all the windows in your house on one day can cause bursitis in the shoulder due to the sudden repetitive irritation.

Treatments

Treatments include exercise programs, weight loss and interventional procedures such as-

  • Steroid injections and facet joint injections
  • Nerve blocks such as the genicular nerve block
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs)
  • Hyaluronic Acid Injections such as Supartz knee injections
  • Medications

If your Bursitis is causing you discomfort, pain, and other symptoms please contact Dr. Chada at (240) 929-6652. Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd, Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769

September 2019

It is thought that nearly 1 in 20 people are affected by fibromyalgia. Of these, a considerable 80-90% of those affected are women. This complex condition can rear its head suddenly and be tricky to diagnose. Patients can be misdiagnosed and consequently improperly treated for diseases that are similar to fibromyalgia.

A huge step forward in the treatment of this debilitating illness is being able to put a name to it. This is important not only with regards to assigning strategic treatment but also for patients being able to validate the pain that they feel.

Causes: Fibromyalgia a chronic condition characterized by pain in the soft tissue surrounding the muscles. Fibromyalgia syndrome can vary in severity and may affect one muscle or an entire group.

Symptoms: Patients report certain tender points or triggers that cause pain. Patients may also report other symptoms such as fatigue, depression and other psychological issues.

Treatments: Physical therapy is considered as the best option for Fibromyalgia syndrome. Interventional procedures include Trigger point injections, Spray and stretch techniques, and Dry needling.If your Fibromyalgia is causing you discomfort, pain, and other symptoms please contact Dr. Chada at (240) 929-6652. Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd, Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769.

August 2019

Occipital Neuralgia

Occipital neuralgia (ON) is a relatively rare primary headache disorder (primary headache disorders are not symptoms of, or caused by, another condition) affecting around 3.2/100,000 people per year.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the distribution of the greater, lesser, and or third occipital nerves (Greater occipital nerve involvement on one side is the most common presentation).
  • Attacks are episodic and last a few seconds to minutes. Pain is piercing, stabbing, or sharp in quality, and severe in intensity.

Treatment

Treatments include pain medicine and nerve blocks. In some patients, occipital nerve stimulation has provided some relief.

If you or someone you love is suffering from this rare condition, allow us to help!Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd, Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769.

July 2019

What Is Myofascial Pain?

Myofascial pain refers to discomfort within a muscle and/or the connective tissue around it, also known as the fascia. This heightened sensitivity is often detected by pressure on the affected area. Depending on the severity of the condition, the pain may develop into a chronic condition called myofascial pain syndrome (MPS).

Such pain is produced by muscle knots and trigger points. These terms can be easy to remember, as someone suffering from myofascial pain may feel like his or her muscles are so tense that they’ve bunched up into knots, triggering irritation, tenderness, and/or tingling near that specific point in the body. However, there are some cases in which another area of the body is also affected, which is known as "referred pain." For example, a hypersensitive trigger point in your shoulder may be the reason you’re experiencing pain radiating down your arm or spine.

Treatments: If you are suffering from discomfort, pain, and other symptoms, please contact Dr. Chada at (240) 929-6652. Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd, Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769. Some interventional procedures include Trigger point injections, Spray and stretch techniques, and Dry needling.

June 2019

What Is Facet Rhizotomy? And how could it limit you?

The facet joints are often the primary source of pain for many back pain sufferers. Facet joints are small joints located in pairs on the back of the spine that provide stability to the spine and allow the spine to move and be flexible.

If your condition is causing you discomfort, pain, and other symptoms by doing a procedure called Facet Rhizotomy. Please contact Dr. Chada at (240) 929-6652. Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd, Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769.

The goal of a Facet Rhizotomy, either a cervical Facet Rhizotomy or Lumbar Facet Rhizotomy, is to provide pain relief by "shutting off" the pain signals that the joints send to the brain. The pain relief experienced by most patients who have this procedure lasts months or even years.

How Facet Rhizotomy isdone?

Patients who are candidates for rhizotomy typically have undergone several facet joint injections to verify the source and exact location of their pain. Using a local anesthetic and x-ray guidance, a needle with an electrode at the tip is placed alongside the small nerves to the facet joint. The electrode is then heated, with a technology called radiofrequency, to deaden these nerves that carry pain signals to the brain.

The procedure takes about 30-60 minutes. Afterward, patients are monitored for a short time before being released.Dr. Chada is a triple board-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd, Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769.

May 2019
3 Tips to Prevent Bulging Discs?

Get back to breathing like a baby

In our first year of life as babies, we naturally learn to belly breathe getting 360-degree expansion around our abdomen. When we learn this, we are teaching our body how to stabilize fully and find intra-abdominal pressure. In fact, a recent study found that patients chronic low back pain were placed in an MRI had a lower ability to have a full excursion of their diaphragm while breathing i.e., they have a harder time belly breathing. That’s how important breathing is for core stability, belly breathing, and preventing disc herniations.

Stay Active

People who remain active tend to be more robust and less likely to have a loss of mobility, injuries, and inflammation. Over time, a sedentary lifestyle can really start to wreak havoc on your discs, causing them to dehydrate, bulge and create back pain—especially if you’re overweight.

Go for walks and try other strength exercises to bulletproof the low back like deadlifting, kettlebell swings, and lunges, always with amazing form. Even a regular stretching routine can do wonders for lengthening the spine and helping posture, flexibility, and agility. This will keep the pain at bay.

Get Enough Sleep and Rest

A good night’s sleep should be a top priority, and a sweet seven to nine hours is ideal. This is critical for keeping stress hormones like cortisol under control, supporting healthy body weight, and reducing the risk of more injuries. Aside from sleeping, resting is also quite important—especially if you’re an athlete training. It’s essential to give your body the appropriate time to rest and recover properly

If your bulging discs is causing you discomfort, pain, and other symptoms please contact Dr. Chada at (240) 929-6652. Dr. Chada is a tripleboard-certified interventional pain management physician who can help reveal your symptoms. She is located at Synergy Spine and Pain Center -12150 Annapolis Rd, Suite 209, Glenn Dale (BOWIE), MD 20769.


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